Principal Investigator

Benjamin Graham

Ben Graham is an assistant professor in the School of International Relations and the resident faculty member in Trojan Hall. His core research is on political risk and foreign investment in emerging markets, focusing particularly on the role of diaspora investors and on the ongoing evolution of international property rights. He also conducts research on federalism, powersharing, and unrecognized states. To view Professor Graham's work, visit his faculty webpage. You can email him at benjamin.a.graham@usc.edu .

Research Areas

Benjamin Graham

Ben Graham is an assistant professor in the School of International Relations and the resident faculty member in Trojan Hall. His core research is on political risk and foreign investment in emerging markets, focusing particularly on the role of diaspora investors and on the ongoing evolution of international property rights. He also conducts research on federalism, powersharing, and unrecognized states. To view Professor Graham's work, visit his faculty webpage. You can email him at benjamin.a.graham@usc.edu .

Research Areas

Jonathan Markowitz

Jonathan Markowitz is an assistant professor in the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California. His primary work is on power projection, the political implications of climate change and resource competition. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the University of California’s Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation. He was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs from 2012-2014 and a post-doctoral fellow at the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College from 2014-2015. He obtained his PhD in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego. To view Professor Markowitz's work, visit his faculty webpage. You can email him at jonathnm@usc.edu .

Research

Jonathan Markowitz

Jonathan Markowitz is an assistant professor in the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California. His primary work is on power projection, the political implications of climate change and resource competition. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the University of California’s Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation. He was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs from 2012-2014 and a post-doctoral fellow at the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College from 2014-2015. He obtained his PhD in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego. To view Professor Markowitz's work, visit his faculty webpage. You can email him at jonathnm@usc.edu .

Research

Megan Becker

Megan Becker is a lecturer in the School of International Relations, where she is also Director of the Undergraduate Research Program. She leads the Lab's teams on International Intervention in Civil Wars and Power Projection in the South China Sea and is responsible for the lab's training, mentoring, and outreach activities. Her research considers the military politics of developing countries, particularly regarding coups, outside military intervention, and the decision to hire private military companies (some people call them mercenaries). She teaches courses on UN Peacekeeping, civil war and other security-related issues. Dr. Becker earned her PhD in Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. To view Prof. Becker's work, visit her faculty webpage. You can email her at meganbec@usc.edu .

Research

Megan Becker

Megan Becker is a lecturer in the School of International Relations, where she is also Director of the Undergraduate Research Program. She leads the Lab's teams on International Intervention in Civil Wars and Power Projection in the South China Sea and is responsible for the lab's training, mentoring, and outreach activities. Her research considers the military politics of developing countries, particularly regarding coups, outside military intervention, and the decision to hire private military companies (some people call them mercenaries). She teaches courses on UN Peacekeeping, civil war and other security-related issues. Dr. Becker earned her PhD in Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. To view Prof. Becker's work, visit her faculty webpage. You can email her at meganbec@usc.edu .

Research

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To Build or To Buy: Understanding the Determinants of Security Privatization

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Of Regimes and Resource Revenue: Contracting for Combat Services in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Military Privatization and Coup-proofing in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2010